Archive

The funeral of Gustav Leonhardt, 24 January 2012: a short report for those who could not attend.

The funeral of Gustav Leonhardt, 24 January 2012: a short report for those who could not attend. [...]

Charles Thornton Lofthouse, the first person to play a harpsichord in the Royal Albert Hall

The fascinating musical life of Charles Thornton Lofthouse, a piano student of Alfred Cortot and a noted continuo player who taught the harpsichord at the Royal College of Music from 1934. [...]

Arnold Dolmetsch remembered

Arnold Dolmetsch remembered, by his wife, Mabel. A blog post on this book, from 1957, highlighting aspects of the life of this great “early music” pioneer. [...]

Baroque orchestra, La Petite Bande, loses vital funding

Despite having amassed almost twenty thousand signatures on an internet-based petition, Sigiswald Kuijken’s baroque orchestra, La Petite Bande, has been definitively told that it will receive no more money from the Belgian government. [...]

Alfred Deller, 100 years on, and what a lot has changed.

 

Alfred Deller was born on May 31, 1912 in the seaside town of Margate, in Kent, England and died on July 16, 1979 while on holiday in Bologna, Italy.

 Alfred Deller can truly be called a pioneer of early music, developing his own voice and taking it to the public sphere in the face [...]

Frans Brüggen on Gustav Leonhardt

This is a translated extract from a 1971 interview, in which Frans Brüggen was asked to explain the “phenomenon Gustav Leonhardt”. It also includes details of a very extensive tribute by an eminent former student and some interesting links relating to Chronik der Anna Magdalena Bach (including an interview with Leonhardt himself) . [...]

“A Long and Beautiful Life”: A tribute to Gustav Leonhardt by Ton Koopman

“A Beautiful Life”: A tribute to Gustav Leonhardt by Ton Koopman [...]

Gustav Leonhardt (1928–2012), the end of an era

Gustav Leonhardt in 1972

 

It’s so sad that Gustav Leonhardt is no more.

I first heard him, partnered by Frans Brüggen in a concert in St Albans. Since then, I’ve seen him many times and, apart from the extraordinary playing, have often been struck by the fact that he mostly used his own [...]

Arnold Dolmetsch – the greatest early music pioneer of the 20th century?

Arnold Dolmetsch with his family in 1932.

Reproduced by kind permission of the University of Melbourne, [Percy] Grainger Museum. For full details see here.

I mentioned in my last post that Mary Potts is remembered only in her obituaries, the most complete of which was published in The Bulletin, the house journal of the Dolmetsch Foundation, [...]

The Early Music revival, does anyone still care?

Early Music (i.e. music up to around 1800) started to become more widely popular after World War II. This blog will primarily be about the pioneers who re-discovered this repertoire and started playing it on original instruments, or modern copies, in the authentic style, which is now often called historically informed performance, or HIP for [...]