Archive

Gustav Leonhardt & Martin Skowroneck – Making harpsichord history

The harpsichord, based on Dulcken 1745, which Martin Skowroneck built in 1962 for Gustav Leonhardt was an important milestone in the early music revival. This article covers their first meeting and Skowroneck’s earlier work which led him to make this game-changing instrument. [...]

Kees Otten, Dutch recorder pioneer

Dutch recorder virtuoso Kees Otten (1924–2008), was the teacher of Frans Brüggen and many others, and a musician of great importance for the emancipation of the recorder in Holland, its acceptance as a serious instrument, and the establishment of historically informed performance practice. [...]

The funeral of Gustav Leonhardt, 24 January 2012: a short report for those who could not attend.

The funeral of Gustav Leonhardt, 24 January 2012: a short report for those who could not attend. [...]

Alfred Deller, Leonhardt & the Harnoncourts: the first recording

Alfred Deller, the Leonhardts & the Harnoncourts: their first ground-breaking recording made on original instruments in Vienna in May 1954. With details of the historical organ used, an excerpt from the record and a link to a 1952 Dutch radio recording. [...]

Gustav Leonhardt symposium report, Utrecht, August 2012.

Report on the Gustav Leonhardt symposium August 2012 by Jed Wentz. This famous baroque-music pioneer was honoured by his peers with performances and papers. [...]

Baroque orchestra, La Petite Bande, loses vital funding

Despite having amassed almost twenty thousand signatures on an internet-based petition, Sigiswald Kuijken’s baroque orchestra, La Petite Bande, has been definitively told that it will receive no more money from the Belgian government. [...]

Alfred Deller, 100 years on, and what a lot has changed.

 

Alfred Deller was born on May 31, 1912 in the seaside town of Margate, in Kent, England and died on July 16, 1979 while on holiday in Bologna, Italy.

 Alfred Deller can truly be called a pioneer of early music, developing his own voice and taking it to the public sphere in the face [...]

Frans Brüggen on Gustav Leonhardt

This is a translated extract from a 1971 interview, in which Frans Brüggen was asked to explain the “phenomenon Gustav Leonhardt”. It also includes details of a very extensive tribute by an eminent former student and some interesting links relating to Chronik der Anna Magdalena Bach (including an interview with Leonhardt himself) . [...]

In Early Music, how famous is “famous enough”?

Following on from my last post on Mary Potts, the forgotten harpsichord teacher of many, including Christopher Hogwood and Colin Tilney (who, like Professor Peter Williams, went on to study with Gustav Leonhardt), I’ve been looking into who else, from Mary’s circle, is remembered – or not.  [...]

“A Long and Beautiful Life”: A tribute to Gustav Leonhardt by Ton Koopman

“A Beautiful Life”: A tribute to Gustav Leonhardt by Ton Koopman [...]