Archive

Gustav Leonhardt symposium report, Utrecht, August 2012.

Report on the Gustav Leonhardt symposium August 2012 by Jed Wentz. This famous baroque-music pioneer was honoured by his peers with performances and papers. […]

Frans Brüggen on Gustav Leonhardt

This is a translated extract from a 1971 interview, in which Frans Brüggen was asked to explain the “phenomenon Gustav Leonhardt”. It also includes details of a very extensive tribute by an eminent former student and some interesting links relating to Chronik der Anna Magdalena Bach (including an interview with Leonhardt himself) . […]

“A Long and Beautiful Life”: A tribute to Gustav Leonhardt by Ton Koopman

“A Beautiful Life”: A tribute to Gustav Leonhardt by Ton Koopman […]

The forgotten harpsichord teacher of Christopher Hogwood & Colin Tilney

 

Mary Potts and her beloved Shudi harpsichord in about 1950 © Estate of Mary Potts 2012

I didn’t really know that much about Mrs Mary Potts (1905 – 1982) when she was my harpsichord teacher in Cambridge, so I googled her name (in 2005) expecting to find a complete biography. She had, after […]

Gustav Leonhardt (1928–2012), the end of an era

Gustav Leonhardt in 1972

It’s so sad that Gustav Leonhardt is no more.

I first heard him, partnered by Frans Brüggen in a concert in St Albans. Since then, I’ve seen him many times and, apart from the extraordinary playing, have often been struck by the fact that he mostly used his own elegant […]

Arnold Goldsbrough – Yorkshireman, organist, harpsichordist & conductor Part 1

 

I mentioned in my post on Thurston Dart that I couldn’t find out much about Arnold Goldsbrough, who had been his teacher at the Royal College of Music 1938–9.

Since then I’ve tracked down Arnold’s son, now in his eighties, who has put me onto his dad’s surviving cronies and told me some […]

How famous is scholar, conductor and harpsichordist Thurston Dart, 40 years on? Part 2

With the death of Dart’s close personal friend and executor William Oxenbury, Gustav Leonhardt is now probably the only person alive who knew Dart, but not as a teacher. They were apparently well acquainted and served together on the jury at the harpsichord competition at Bruges.

Their approach to Froberger seems quite similar in […]

How famous is scholar, conductor and harpsichordist Thurston Dart, 40 years on?   Part 1 

Music Faculty, King’s College, University of London, 1968. Reproduced by kind permission of King’s College London. Professor Thurston Dart (holding the serpent) was at the time King Edward Professor of Music and established the faculty in 1964.

The composer Michael Nyman well-known for his collaboration on Peter Greenaway’s films, is described on a […]

The Early Music revival, does anyone still care?

Early Music (i.e. music up to around 1800) started to become more widely popular after World War II. This blog will primarily be about the pioneers who re-discovered this repertoire and started playing it on original instruments, or modern copies, in the authentic style, which is now often called historically informed performance, or HIP for […]